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Central Thailand Mission

Central Thailand Mission

Central Thailand Mission was a group project undertaken during the Professional Web Design Course I attended at Web Courses Bangkok.

Contributing to the community

The objective was to find a charity in need of a website, or a redesign of their existing website. Our school was keen to contribute back to their community and also to give their students real projects to work on. By working on a real project a month into the course, we learned lots about working with clients in addition to improving our design and development skills.

Central Thailand Mission was a group project undertaken during the Professional Web Design Course I attended at Web Courses Bangkok.

Contributing to the community

The objective was to find a charity in need of a website, or a redesign of their existing website. Our school was keen to contribute back to their community and also to give their students real projects to work on. By working on a real project a month into the course, we learned lots about working with clients in addition to improving our design and development skills.

The original design

Central Thailand Mission’s website was not the easiest on the eye, but to focus on the asthetics would be to miss the major problem. Our team struggled to work out what this organisation actually did.

While the home page clearly fails in this regard, choosing instead to act as a blog page, you may assume that the ‘What we do’ page, clearly visible in the navigation, would solve this problem.

Unfortunately, this page gave us an overload of information – with thick blocks of text and numerous images. This is because Central Thailand Mission does indeed take on a large amount of projects, acting as an intermediary between charitable causes and those that can help them. Trying to include all of these activities on their previous website simply confused the reader. Creating a design that would allow the organisation to communicate their wide ranging mission in a clear way was the main objective of our design.

The original design

Central Thailand Mission’s website was not the easiest on the eye, but to focus on the asthetics would be to miss the major problem. Our team struggled to work out what this organisation actually did.

While the home page clearly fails in this regard, choosing instead to act as a blog page, you may assume that the ‘What we do’ page, clearly visible in the navigation, would solve this problem.

Unfortunately, this page gave us an overload of information – with thick blocks of text and numerous images. This is because Central Thailand Mission does indeed take on a large amount of projects, acting as an intermediary between charitable causes and those that can help them. Trying to include all of these activities on their previous website simply confused the reader. Creating a design that would allow the organisation to communicate their wide ranging mission in a clear way was the main objective of our design.

User Experience Design (Wireframe)

Our objective with the homepage was to convey as clearly as possible what the organisation did. An image speaks a thousand words, and using a static hero image would give the organisation the opportunity to pick the best possible photo and stick with it.

Beneath the hero image was a short block of text, offering Central Thailand Mission the opportunity to explain their mission. From there, we wanted to guide the user to further information about the orgainisation, either what they do or who they help.

The ‘Get Involved’ button allows the website visitor to go directly to action, by directing them to the ‘How you can help’ page.

If the user continued to scroll, there would be a third means to convey the organisation’s purpose, using a carousel of the charitable causes they were involved with.

News was relegated towards the bottom of the page as it was requested there by the organisation’s owner.

Finally, a call to action asking the reader to either volunteer or donate is at the bottom of the page, though the primary call to action is in the ‘Get Involved’ buttons that direct to the ‘How You Can Help’ pages throughout the site.

User Experience Design (Wireframe)

Our objective with the homepage was to convey as clearly as possible what the organisation did. An image speaks a thousand words, and using a static hero image would give the organisation the opportunity to pick the best possible photo and stick with it.

Beneath the hero image was a short block of text, offering Central Thailand Mission the opportunity to explain their mission. From there, we wanted to guide the user to further information about the orgainisation, either what they do or who they help.

The ‘Get Involved’ button allows the website visitor to go directly to action, by directing them to the ‘How you can help’ page.

If the user continued to scroll, there would be a third means to convey the organisation’s purpose, using a carousel of the charitable causes they were involved with.

News was relegated towards the bottom of the page as it was requested there by the organisation’s owner.

Finally, a call to action asking the reader to either volunteer or donate is at the bottom of the page, though the primary call to action is in the ‘Get Involved’ buttons that direct to the ‘How You Can Help’ pages throughout the site.

User Interface Design (Photoshop)

The user interface design of the new website took the orange colour that dominated the original site and used it more sparingly throughout the site. The green colour used to highlight buttons to the user complements the orange well, in what is otherwise a more reserved colour scheme, which allows the images and text to stand out.

User Interface Design (Photoshop)

The user interface design of the new website took the orange colour that dominated the original site and used it more sparingly throughout the site. The green colour used to highlight buttons to the user complements the orange well, in what is otherwise a more reserved colour scheme, which allows the images and text to stand out.

Please see the full homescreen below.

You can find a live version of this website here.

The most obvious difference is that we have used the organisation’s own logo instead of the one we mocked up in the PSD.

The page still currently has stock images, dummy text, dummy sponsors etc due to delayed content.

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